PRESCRIPTION AND NON‑PRESCRIPTION

DRUGS VERSUS FOOD AND/OR NUTRITION

 

ANTIBIOTICS:  Should the family of antibiotics called tetracyclines (and some other antibiotics) encounter calcium or iron in the stomach, they can bind chemically and cancel both the antibiotic and the mineral(s) out.  To be safe, take the antibiotics one hour before or two hours after meals and/or nutrition.  When taking any antibiotics, stop using lactic acid products, including kefir, yogurt and buttermilk, as they can render antibiotics less effective.

ANTI‑COAGULANTS:  The drug warfarin (Coumadin, Panwarfin and Sofarin are some brand names) is prescribed to stop the development of blood clots.  This drug works by reducing blood levels of vitamin K, which aids clotting.  Patients on this drug should avoid vitamin K supplements and foods rich in vitamin K such as broccoli, cabbage, lettuce and turnip greens.  Lactobacillus products like kefir and yogurt also contain vitamin K.  However, there are so many benefits from lactobacillus products that patients should consult with their physician.

ANTI‑DEPRESSANT DRUGS:  The monoamine‑oxidase inhibitors (Marplan, Nardil and Parnate are some brand names) can have potentially disastrous effects should the drugs come in contact with the amino acid component tyramine.  The drugs interfere with the body’s normal metabolism of tyramine.  Tyramine is found in chicken livers, chocolate, shrimp, yeast, vitamin and protein supplements; lactic acid products, including kefir, yogurt and buttermilk; aged foods, including cheeses, pickled herring, sauerkraut; smoked, dried, fermented or processed fish, meats, sausages, fruits and vegetables; and fermented beverages like beer and wine.  If you eat or drink these at or near the same time that you take one of these anti‑depressants, you risk dangerously high blood pressure, palpitations, nausea and stroke.  Patients on these drugs should consider these foods and beverages forbidden.

ASTHMA MEDICATION:  The drug theophylline (Marax, Quibron and Tedral are some brand names) can be designed to disperse into the body slowly over the course of a day.  When this drug is taken with food and particularly fatty food, a large proportion of the whole day’s dosage can rush into the body at once.  This phenomenon, known as dose‑dumping, can cause irregular heartbeat and even convulsions.  Unless your physician advises otherwise, take the drug with water on an empty stomach.

BLOOD PRESSURE DRUGS:  The thiazide diuretics (HydroDiuril, Hygroton and Zaroxolyn are some brand names) and the loop diuretics (Bumez, Edecrin and Lasix are some brand names) help lower blood pressure by ridding the blood of sodium.  However, potassium can also be lost.  Physicians should monitor for potassium level and prescribe supplements if necessary.

The combination diuretics (Aldactazide, Dyazide and Moduretic are some brand names) and the ACE inhibitors (Capoten, Prinivil and Vasotec are some brand names) block this potassium depletion.  However, with these drugs it is possible to have too much potassium, which is also dangerous to proper heart function.  Patients on these drugs should consult with their physician before using a salt substitute containing potassium.

PAINKILLERS:  Aspirin (Bayer, Bufferin, Excedrin and Medaprin are some brand names) and ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin and Nuprin are some brand names).  These anti‑inflammatory painkillers are notoriously hard on the stomach lining.  Those who take these drugs over the long‑term may risk iron‑depletion anemia from the minor but steady internal bleeding caused by these drugs.  So, do not mix these drugs with alcohol, coffee or fruit juices, which are also hard on your stomach.  Aspirin takes 5 to 10 times as long to be absorbed when taken with food or shortly after a meal than when taken on an empty stomach.  This can mean the difference between getting rid of a headache in 30 minutes or 3 hours.

ALCOHOL:  Ask your physician or pharmacist about alcohol and the drug(s) you are taking.  Any doubts, do not use alcohol.  To be absolutely safe, do not use alcohol.

Aspirin and alcohol can cause excessive stomach bleeding.

Barbiturates and alcohol can be deadly.

Chlorpropamide (Diabinese and Glucamide are some brand names) and alcohol can cause nausea and flushing.  This oral diabetes drug can keep the body from metabolizing alcohol properly.

Nitroglycerin and alcohol can lower blood pressure to dangerous levels, causing dizziness and even unconsciousness.

THERE ARE TOO MANY BRAND NAME DRUGS TO MENTION HERE.  ASK YOUR PHARMACIST FOR THE GENERIC NAME OF ANY BRAND NAME DRUG THAT YOU ARE TAKING, AND ALSO THE DRUG CLASSIFICATION.

http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/english/iyh/food/grapefruit.html

PRESCRIPTION AND NON‑PRESCRIPTION DRUGS VERSUS FOOD AND/OR NUTRITION     by Robert A Kroboth     WWW.CitizenGadfly.Com

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